Forensic Anthropology

Forensic Anthropology

Write Annotated Bibliographies for each case.
 
Annotated Bibliography
Burns, Karen Ramey. The Herring Case- An Outlier.  In Dawnie Steadman, Hard
Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology, 2nd Edition. Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, 2009.
The author indicates that each forensic case, involving bones, is unique. He explores the aspects of uniqueness which color varied cases, through an evaluation of the Herring Case. He explores the case via its different phases. The phases are recovery, explanation, analysis and finally, identification.  In the article, the author discusses various probable enhancements which would have been effected in the varied phases to make the whole case much neater and conclusive.
Gill-King, Harrell. An incidental finding.  In Dawnie Steadman, Hard Evidence:
    Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology, 2nd Edition. Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, 2009.
The article is concerned with the weighting of incidental findings in determining forensic concerns. Through the presented case, it is amply indicated that such findings are necessary in reviving, sustaining as well as resolving abstractive, justice as well as equity questions, especially to the world of the living. The article challenges all those reading it to mull over how such findings can occasion unnecessarily devastating concerns or grieving.
Steadman, Dawnie Wolfe and Lyle Konigsberg. Multiple Points of Similarity. In
Dawnie Steadman, Hard Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology, 2nd Edition (pp 68-79). Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, 2009.
The article shows how past deformations to an individual’s skeleton can be employed by forensic anthropologists, pathologists, odontologists and radiologists in identifying them, long following their demise. The authors attempt to address the concerns on just how many similarity-points would suffice a positive identification. They revisit past contestations on such numbers, generally agreeing that the number of such points which are enough for a given identification are dependent on the uniqueness of each singular case.
Steadman, Dawnie Wolfe. Personal Identification: Theory and Applications. The Case
Study Approach.  In Dawnie Steadman, Hard Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology, 2nd Edition. Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, 2009.
The article provides a foundation to the content covered in Hard Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology. The author posits the importance of usage of anthropological practices, especially the usage of bones and skeletons, in forensics. The application of the practices is shown as being capable of making out individuals’ identification long following their death. It provides an historical overview of the formalization of forensic anthropological practices and the creation of the AAFS (American Academy of Forensic Sciences). The article indicates the close relation between the practices and forensic investigations within the lab, the courts and fields and also presents some ethical concerns which attend to forensic anthropologists.
Steadman, Dawnie Wolfe and Steven Andersen. The Marty Miller Case: Introducing
Forensic Anthropology.  In Dawnie Steadman, Hard Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology, 2nd Edition. Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, 2009.
The article is largely based on the trial of Miller, a leader in a religious school and a carpenter, for murdering Mary Miller. The author dwells on the attendant identifications which were founded on biological examination as well as analysis of Mary’s skeleton in Binghamton’s Forensic Anthropology Laboratory. He underscores the significance of comprehending the fundamental biological principles of skeletons in forensic anthropology.
 
Works cited:
Burns, Karen Ramey. The Herring Case- An Outlier.  In Dawnie Steadman, Hard
Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology, 2nd Edition. Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, 2009.
Gill-King, Harrell. An incidental finding.  In Dawnie Steadman, Hard Evidence:
    Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology, 2nd Edition. Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, 2009.
Steadman, Dawnie Wolfe and Lyle Konigsberg. Multiple Points of Similarity. In
Dawnie Steadman, Hard Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology, 2nd Edition (pp 68-79). Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, 2009.
Steadman, Dawnie Wolfe. Personal Identification: Theory and Applications. The Case
Study Approach.  In Dawnie Steadman, Hard Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology, 2nd Edition. Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, 2009.
Steadman, Dawnie Wolfe and Steven Andersen. The Marty Miller Case: Introducing
Forensic Anthropology.  In Dawnie Steadman, Hard Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology, 2nd Edition. Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, 200

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