Disorders of White Blood Cells and Lymphoid Tissues

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Norris, T. (2019). Porth’s Pathophysiology: Concepts of Altered Health      States. 10th Ed. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.    ISBN: 978-1-4963-7755-5

 

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Max is a 60-year-old living in Iowa. For the 27 years, he has been working in the agricultural industry, particularly in the management of corn production. Recently, he began to feel weak during work and tired easily. During the night, he woke up sweating, and he often felt unusually warm during the day. Max was also surprised that, in spite of eating regularly, his weight was declining, and his work pants were now too large for him. Upon physical examination, his physician noted that his inguinal lymph nodes were swollen although Max said that they were not sore. Subsequent laboratory tests confirmed follicular, non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Chemotherapy in conjunction with rituximab was immediately initiated.

  1. What are the key cellular differences between non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma?
  2. The early manifestations of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma in lymphatic tissue appear differently. In terms of lymphatic presentation, how would these two diseases appear clinically?
  3. What are the pharmacologic properties of rituximab, and what is its mechanism of action on malignant cells?
  4. Outline the structure of lymph node parenchyma including the areas where B and T lymphocytes reside. Where did Max’s lymphoma arise?

Please be brief with your answers-do not copy answers from the book-read the case study and answer in your own words-briefly! You are not required to cite as your answers should come from your textbook-it is a demonstration that you understand the content and the case study.

Follow this example; Example;

Case Study, Chapter 4, Genetic Control of Cell Function and Inheritance Marsha and Clement are both carriers of sickle cell anemia, a disease that is autosomal recessive. Their first child, Amelia, does not have the disease. Marsha and Clement are planning another pregnancy, but they are concerned about their second child having the condition. Clement’s father died from complications of sickle cell disease shortly before Amelia was born

  1. What is the likelihood of Marsha and Clement having a baby with sickle cell anemia? What is the chance the baby will be a carrier of the disease, just like the parents?

The gene is recessive, so the parents will have a 25% chance of giving birth to a child with the disease. There is a 50% chance that the baby will be a carrier

  1. Marsha suggested to the nurse at the local family planning clinic that if the baby were a boy, he might have a higher risk of developing the disease, just like his grandfather. How would you respond?

The disease is autosomal in nature, meaning the disease arises from an abnormality on chromosomes 1 to 22. These chromosomes are alike in both males and females.

  1. When Amelia, who does not have sickle cell anemia, grows up and marries someone who does have the disease, how likely will her children have the disease?

If Amelia has children to a father with sickle cell disease, the children will be carriers only.

 

 

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