Definition of Comics

Straight analytical papers discussing the form and the theme of a graphic narrative, for comic in Asia-Pacific region.

minimum 5 pages

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
Definition of Comics
Just from $13/Page
Order Essay

Could be comic Doraemon (just a suggestion)

must include:

theme

drawing technic

some history of the comic

the author

(useful notes: Scott McCloud’s Understanding Comics)

SCOTT MCCLOUD UNDERSTANDING COMICS

 

Definition of Comics

· “Juxtaposed pictorial and other images in deliberate sequence intended to convey information and/or to produce an aesthetic response in the viewer.”

(McCloud 1993, 9)

 

KEY CONCEPTS–IMAGES

· 3 types of icons: symbols, words, pictures (27)

· The more “cartoony” the image the more universal its appeal (30-43)

· The invisible world (such as emotions) can be represented by symbols, backgrounds, word balloons, and lettering styles (130-134)

· The panel/frame is comics’ most important icon—it is an indicator of time and space (98-99)

 

The Masking Effect

Putting a cartoonish character in a realistically drawn setting.

 

KEY CONCEPTS—SPACE TIME

· Space does for comics what time does for film (7)

· The “gutter” is the place of “closure” (63-66)

· Various types of panel transitions (70-72)

· Time can be controlled through panel content, number of panels, closure between panels, size of panel (101)

· Silent panels and bleeds can offer a sense of timelessness (102-3)

· Zip-ribbons, multiple images, photographic streaking are another representation of time span (114)

 

6 TYPES OF PANEL TRANSITIONS

· Moment to Moment

· Action to action

· Subject to Subject

· Scene to scene

· Aspect to Aspect

· Non Sequitur

 

IMPORTANCE OF LINES IN TRYING TO CAPTURE EMOTION, PSYCHOLOGICAL STATES

 

ALSO EMOTIONAL EFFECTS–MORE COMMON IN SHOJO, BUT ALSO A MORE LIMITED RANGE IN SHONEN

 

 

 

 

McCLOUD’s MAIN IDEAS

· Definition—”Juxtaposed pictorial and other images in deliberate sequence intended to convey information and/or produce an aesthetic response in the viewer”

· 3 types of icons

· More cartoony images = more universal appeal

· Many graphic ways to represent “invisible world”

· Panel is a key icon indicating time and space

· Space does for comics what time does for film

· Gutter is the space of closure

· 6 panel transitions

· Panels, bleeds, zip-ribbons all can help represent time

 

 

A FEW MORE IDEAS FROM MCCLOUD:

· SHOW vs. TELL

· THEORY of ART

· IMPORTANCE OF COLOR

 

 

Neil Cohn has some different ideas about analyzing how comics make meaning for us. Rather than panel transitions, he wants to use bigger units for analyzing narrative–like the structure or “grammar” of how particular units of story–in this case, an action arc or an event arc–are put together to make meaning.

His categories are as follows:

 

· ESTABLISHER

· INITIAL

· PEAK

· RELEASE

· REFINER

· ENVIRONMENTAL CONJUNCTION

 

Here’s What He Means…

 

· ESTABLISHER—setting up an interaction without acting upon it

· INITIAL—depicting the nascent starting point of an event or action

· PEAK—showing the maximal point of tension of an event or action

· RELEASE—releasing the tension of an event or action

· REFINER—acting as a modifier by honing in on information contained in one or more of the core categories

· ENVIRONMENTAL CONJUNCTION—two characters or objects united by the same narrative state or moment

 

 

In addition, you can think of different panels in this way:

POLYMORPHIC–where an action is represented by showing the same character in two or more phases of an action or movement within one panel. This is often accompanied by zip lines or motion lines.

 

MACRO–showing a large scene or more than one character

 

MONO–panel showing one character

 

MICRO–panel showing only one part of a character or object

 

We can also borrow terms from film to think of proximity and angle: close-up, medium range, or long-distance shots; birds eye view or crane shot; worm’s eye view.

 

Japan has its own specific set of emoticons for representing lust, sleep, anger, irritation, shock or exasperation relief, and even the chibi.

 

JESSE COHN also introduces two ways to categorize page layouts and art styles:

LINEAR–panels are arranged in a more or less easy to follow order with very few bleeds or images that extend beyond one panel into another. This is the most common style for shonen manga.

 

TABULAR–when pages are much more freely laid out with narrow dividers between panels, text and images mixed in less conventional ways, frequent use of bleeds and images that interrupt typical panel progressions, making reading a little more challenging but artistically more adventurous. More typical for shojo.

 

 

JAPANESE COMICS AS A DISTINCT DIALECT OF INTERNATIONAL COMICS

· Masking Effect

· More use of Moment-to Moment and Aspect-to-Aspect Transitions

· Use of negative space

· More use of bleeds

· Subjective motion

· More focus on Journey than on the goal

· Own emoticons

· More use of micros and monos

· More expressionistic effects (especially shojo)

 

ERIC RABKIN—TIME COMPLICATIONS

· Time in graphic narratives is controlled by the density of information and representational immediacy in each frame.

3 Narrative Modes

· “Description”-our reading time is slower than real time—we get into lots of detail

· “Dramatization”—reading time is approximately the same as the time of what we see occur

· “Summary”—reading time is much shorter than what is narrated

ORDER NOW »»

and taste our undisputed quality.