Annotated Bibliography

Schepartz, Lynne, Sherry Fox and Chryssi Bourbou, Eds. New Directions in the
Skeletal Biology of Greece. Princeton, New Jersey, NJ: The American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 2009.
The authors, in the book, concern themselves with the historical accounts of the biology of skeletons, with most of the focus laid on palaeolithic Greece to modern Greece. Most of the content presented is amply backed by related biological research findings on various remains of skeletons. The researches have been carried out using modern analytic techniques occasioning findings which are quite revealing regarding numerous facets of human populations.
The authors also include varied case studies as well as imitation surveys based on the tackled content areas. There is an ample account of the current bioarchaeology studies, especially within Greece. To a trained eye, there is one glaring failing in the text.  The aims of the authors are not well addressed.  For persons are adequately aware of bioarchaeological and funerary findings and studies in Greece, by going through this book, will certainly conclude that no novel directions are offered in the book as, it comes areas which have been variously been widely researched on in the past.
Possibly, this failing may have been persuaded by the editors’ moot criteria for selecting the presented papers as well as the editors’ interventions; involving the submitted photos, bibliographies as well as papers. Within the volume, the authors succeed in effectively exploring the ways in which ancient technical approaches can be adopted to make new revelations on formerly inexplicable questions. Accordingly, anthropologists with heavy orientations towards biology can benefit, immensely from the rich presentations of documentary as well as archaeological evidences in molding fitting hypotheses for related works.
Dickson, James, Klaus Oeggl and Linda Handley. “The Iceman Reconsidered.”
            Scientific American, 15(2005): 4-10
The authors of the article present various surveys of existing avenues as well as theories which have previously informed researches concerning the Iceman. Iceman was a corpse which had been preserved in Alps for thousands of years, by ice sheets. In the article, they explore past scientific efforts to study the Iceman (christened Otzi as the locality where the corpses was discovered). Otzi’s origins, death as well as life on earth are retraced, or even more appropriately, reconsidered in the light of existing remains and past studies. The article is easy to follow, and exciting through the incorporation of twenty five colorful photographs as well as two maps. The photographs and the maps give an apt overview of the rest of text in the article.
Dickson, Oeggl and Handley, in the article, assume an unusual approach in the discussions of the discovery of Otzi as well as the import of the discovery to world anthropology. Their presentation is highly illuminating on the possible reasons why Otzi and others like Kwäday Dän Ts’ìnchí inhabited the cold mountainous region. The article also retraces the circumstances surrounding his demise as well as preservation. Dickson, Oeggl and Handley discuss the findings of recent meticulous researches which have been carried out to address previous cultural speculations on the Iceman and humanity during his times. The authors show the value of scientific examinations concerning discoveries from ancient times in anthropology.
 
Works cited:
Dickson, James, Klaus Oeggl and Linda Handley. “The Iceman Reconsidered.”
Scientific American, 15(2005): 4-10
Schepartz, Lynne, Sherry Fox and Chryssi Bourbou, Eds. New Directions in the
Skeletal Biology of Greece. Princeton, New Jersey, NJ: The American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 2009.
 

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